Thursday, December 30, 2010

Significant 2011 NEC Code Changes Part II

Significant 2011 NEC Code Changes Part II

Chapter 2, 2011 NEC

"Article 200.1, Scope,"

Informational Note Changed:

"Grounding Conductor" has been changed to "Equipment Grounding Conductor (the EGC) and "Grounding Electrode conductor (the GEC)" was added. This more accurately reflects Article 100's defined terms.

"Article 200.2 "General,"

Wording/Section Changed:

Previously there were 10 specific code sections listed for systems that prohibited or exempted the installation of grounded (neutral) conductors. Now the wording is changed to "systems SPECIFICALLY exempted or prohibited by OTHER SECTIONS of this Code."

"Article 200.2(B), Continuity,"

Informational Note Added:

Section B was a 2008 NEC edition code change that prohibited using a metal enclosure as a connection pathway for the continuity of the grounded conductor (neutral). For the 2011 edition, an informational note was added, linking this section to the device rule in Article 300.13(B), "Device Removal." That article prohibits the use of a device or lampholder as a continuity pathway for the grounded conductor in a multiwire branch circuit (the "pigtail" rule).

"Article 200.4, Neutral Conductors,"

New Section Added:

Wording has been added that restricts the sharing of a neutral conductor by more than one set of feeders or one multiwire branch circuit. It does allow an exception if another are of the Code specifically allows for neutral sharing as is the case in Article 215.4(A) "Feeders With Common Neutral Conductor."

"Article 200.6(A) Means of Identifying Grounded Conductors, Sized 6 AWG or Smaller,"

Section is Changed:

The new outline greatly simplifies and makes this section easier to read. Essentially the basic rules are no longer in their former paragraph format. They are now bulleted into the existing numbered list, increasing the previous edition's list from 4 items to 8 items.

"Article 200.6(D) Grounded Conductors of Different Systems,"

New Paragraph Added:

A new directive has been added that now requires a placard or some sort of permanent type documentation to be installed at the origination point (panel) where different grounded conductors from various services are installed. This documentation shall list the color/identification scheme employed in the installation. An example of this was shown as an Exhibit (200.3) in the 2008 NEC Handbook, and is now a requirement. This helps the technician readily and easily trace different system's neutrals safely and quickly. Note that there was already and existing requirement for the Phase Coloring Scheme in 210.5(C).

"Article 200.7(C), (the so-called "Neutral as a Switch Leg" rule)

Article is Changed:

Wording has been added that clarifies and specifically allows the use of colored tape when re-identifying a white or grey colored insulation for the use as an ungrounded (hot) conductor.

Paragraph #(2) has been deleted and it's intent has become the formerly numbered section (3). It formerly contained the rule that allows for the use of the white colored conductor in a cable assembly (such as in a "romex" cable) as a switch leg in single, 3-way, or 4-way switching. This wording is now deleted. In it's place is the rule allowing the use of the white or grey conductor in a flexible cord (such as an SO or Appliance cord) as an ungrounded (hot) conductor.

"Article 210.4(B) Multiwire Branch Circuits, Disconnecting Means,"

Informational Note Added:

The new informational note adds a reference to Article 240.15(B) "Circuit Breaker as an Overcurrent Device" to tie the two articles together. 210.4(B) requires a simultaneous disconnecting means for all ungrounded conductors. 240.15(B)(1) allows the use of an OCPD for multiwire branch circuits; with identified handle-ties in order to operate ALL poles of the circuit simultaneously.

"Article 210.4(D) Grouping"

Article is Changed:

New wording extends the grouping rule that was new for the 2008 Code. Previously a wire tie (or similar means) was required in panels to show the 'grouping' of multiwire branch conductors. The new rule is to extend this requirement out to each junction box or anywhere that splices or connections are made in the entire circuit. Note that the rule excluding cable assemblies (such as MC Cable or NMC, "Romex") and individual dedicated conduits has not been changed.

 

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